Volunteer

Thank you so much for your interest in volunteering with CRi! For the time being, COVID-19 has put our in-person volunteer projects on pause. However, as our residents and staff work together to weather this storm, we still need your support. Consider engaging with staff and residents through our virtual volunteering opportunities!

Donations and homemade projects can be dropped off to the following addresses:

Chantilly HQ

  • 14160 Newbrook Dr, Chantilly, VA 20151

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby beyond the double glass doors

  • Accepting donations Monday to Sunday from 10am to 2pm

Arlington/Falls Church Maintenance Office

  • 7297A Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA 22042

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby just inside the front door

  • Accepting donations Monday to Friday from 10am to 2pm

Richmond

  • 808 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 120, Richmond, VA 23235

  • Accepting donations Monday to Friday from 8am to 3:30pm

Volunteer opportunities for Individuals Groups & Partnerships

Homemade Masks Needed!

Some of the individuals CRi supports are some of our community’s most vulnerable, and as such, are in dire need of homemade masks. If you are able to sew, please consider making masks for CRi residents and direct support professionals. Not sure where to get started? Check out the CDC’s website for instructions on homemade cloth masks - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-make-cloth-face-covering.html

Once masks are made, they can be donated at one of three locations:

Chantilly HQ

  • 14160 Newbrook Dr, Chantilly, VA 20151
  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby beyond the double glass doors
  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

Arlington/Falls Church Maintenance Office

  • 7297A Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA 22042
  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby just inside the front door
  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 10am to 2pm

Richmond

  • 808 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 120, Richmond, VA 23235
  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 8am to 3:30pm

Homemade Sensory Boards for Residents

With COVID changing the way we all interact with the world, we’ve had to adjust our routines, implement coping mechanisms, and find new strategies to connect with our loved ones. CRi residents have had to do the same, but many don’t understand why. They can no longer go to their day-programs, see friends from other homes, or venture into the community for a fun outing. Sensory boards can help individuals with mental health needs and developmental disabilities work on directing their focus and practicing their motor skills. Sensory boards present multiple stimuli that are great outlets for residents and provide tools to staff to encourage continued development while homebound.

How can you help? Find items in your house that you can add to the board that can be a tactile stimulant (smooth, rough, soft, hard – tile, fabric, carpet, old plastic toy), make a noise (bike bell, old computer mouse or keyboard, Velcro), or be manipulated (light switch, door knob, chair wheels, old calculator, chain locks). This is a great activity to complete with the kids and a great way to up-cycle some of the items around the house. Check out this website for ideas and inspiration: https://www.weareteachers.com/diy-sensory-board-for-classroom/

Supplies

  • Base board - You can use plywood or MDF. Home Depot and Lowes might have some small scrap pieces you can purchase at a discount. Plywood is better than plastic as it’s sturdier and easier to glue stuff to.

  • Sand paper – 100 – 200 grit.

  • Glue – STRONG glue. Ideally something like Gorilla glue that can be used for multiple surfaces.

  • Paint and paintbrushes – Optional! Make sure to use something like Behr Paint and Primer In-One or you can use stain to keep some of that natural wood finish. Adding a touch of color will help provide a smooth and colorful background for your sensory board.

  • Drill, drill bits, and screws (Optional)

  • ALL THE THINGS

    • Something soft (Feathers? Felt?)

    • Something rough (Lego pieces? Velcro?)

    • Something that makes a noise (Old computer mouse, old key board, metal chain, plastic belt?)

    • Something interactive (Old remote control, zipper, door knobs, fidget spinner?)

How to Get Started

1) Find a good piece of wood for your base board.

2) Sand down the edges and surfaces of the board. Say no to splinters!

3) If you would like to add color to your base board, do it now to let the board dry.

4) While you wait, and this is the fun part, grab the family and start collecting the items for your board! They can be anything around the house and a great way to upcycle some old items. When identifying objects for your board think about how they will need to be secured to the wood (Screws? Glue? Tile adhesive? etc) and that they are explorer friendly (no sharp edges, no small, loose edible pieces, and each piece has been cleaned and sanitized). Suggestion – if using items that require batteries, make sure not to glue the access to the batteries to the board so they can be exchanged.

  • Look for variety:

    • Something soft (Ex: Piece of felt, piece of velvet)

    • Something textured (Ex: Lego pieces, Velcro, piece of carpet)

    • Something that makes a noise (Ex: Old computer mouse, old key board, metal chain, plastic clicky belt)

    • Something interactive (Ex: Old remote control, zipper, door knobs, fidget spinner)

5) Once you have collected all your items. Plan on how you would like them placed on your board. Make sure there is enough space on the board to interact with each item.

6) Depending on the items you would like to use, you will need different tools (glue, drill and screws, etc) to adhere them to the base board. This is an adults only step. Be cognizant of the fumes if using super glue.

Tip: Check out your local Habitat Restore for the base board and fun items to add to your collection like tile, chair wheels, or coiled door stops that go “Boing”.

7) Let dry.

8) Test run! Make sure you test out all the components:

  • Is everything securely attached to the board?

  • There are no small pieces that can fall/be broken off?

  • Are there sharp corners or edges?

  • If it’s fun to touch or fiddle with, you’ve done good work!

9) Sanitize before donating!

Interactive Sound Sensory Boards for CRi Residents

Are you looking for a fun yet slightly more advanced project to complete with your family that’s both educational and impactful? Consider making an Interactive Sound Sensory Board for CRi residents to help them develop their fine motor skills, help direct their focus, and have a fun and creative outlet.

Interactive Sensory Boards are a great way for your family to learn about electricity and coding while having fun working together to build something unique and innovative. The Interactive Sound Sensory Board is a great starter project be it that you assemble the items yourself or purchase the kit through Bare Conductive. Either way, no soldering is required!

Getting Started

OR
Bare Conductive Touch Board Starter Kit - https://www.bareconductive.com/shop/touch-board-starter-kit/

  • Instead of building your board on a wall, use an MDF board or sanded and sealed plywood. This video uses an acrylic board to attach the circuits which is durable and light weight, but not the best adhesive for the electric paint.
  • Glue all the pieces onto the board, even the speakers if they’re small enough. Just be sure to leave enough room for the SD card and any plugs, such as the power cord, to be removed.
  • Be creative with the designs and the sounds! Go with a theme such as nature – (birds chirping, leaves rustling, bubbling stream, etc), car sounds – you can even design you board to be the dashboard of a car (horn honking, acceleration, breaking, radio, blinker, etc), animal sounds, a piano, or an entire band (drums, guitar, base, snare, etc). The opportunities are endless!
  • Make sure all noises work and everything is glued on securely before donating at any one of our three locations listed at the top of the page.

If you want a more challenging project, check out Bare Conductive’s website for more ideas, or consider creating an Interactive Light Sensory Board - https://www.instructables.com/id/Interactive-LED-Tile-Wall-Easier-Than-It-Looks/.

Many thanks to Instructables.com and Bare Conductive for the inspiration and instruction!

Love Rocks

Have you ever found yourself walking down the street only to have a pop of color catch your eye? What’s that?! A rock. A colorful rock. With something nice on it that just made your day. This is a great family friendly project to get those creative juices flowing while spreading some kindness and promoting CRi!

Supplies

  • Rocks! Preferably smooth river rocks, but any rocks of any size and color will do!

  • Acrylic paint – bold bright colors and/or solid dark colors hold up best

  • Paint brushes – various sizes

  • Cup of water

  • Newspaper or plastic drop cloth

  • Acrylic paint pens (not necessary, but certainly fun!)

  • Stencils (not necessary, but helpful!)

  • Sealant - https://rockpainting101.com/best-sealer-painted-rocks/

How to get started

1) Prep your workspace – Either indoors or outdoors, make sure it’s well ventilated. Lay down your newspaper or drop cloth to prevent any spills.

2) Choose your rocks – Make sure that the design you wish to paint fits on your rock.

3) Wash your rocks – Rinse your rock in water to remove any excess dirt that might come off during the painting process.

4) Let your rocks dry - Do not skip this step! Yes, we know its time consuming but any excess water will mix with the paint in the next step and it won’t stick to the rock’s surface as well as it should.

5) Design and paint your rocks – Spread the love! Lots of color is always a good option, and any uplifting sayings will be sure to bring a smile to someone’s face. Be sure to tag the rock using the following hashtags on the back #MyCRi or #EmbraceCRi.

6) Let your rocks dry again – Do not skip this step either!

7) Seal your rocks – Whether you use paint-on sealer or spray, make sure your paint is dry before you start! Apply the coats lightly and use multiple coats.

8) Let them dry – last time!

9) Share your rocks! – First, share photos of your rocks on social media with the hashtag #MyCRi or #EmbraceCRi. Then, hide your rocks in your yard (or along your regular daily stroll for positive mental and physical health!) for people to spot or put them along your sidewalk for people to take and hide themselves.

**Rock Painting Tips and Tricks Courtesy of rockpainting101.com **

  • Make sure that you seal your rocks well. You want them to hold up to the elements until they are found.

  • Never glue embellishments to rocks you plan on hiding. While they are beautiful, these additions are terrible for the environment and the animals. No matter how strong you think that glue is, a squirrel is going to be able to pick it off. Stick to paint on any rock you plan on hiding.

  • Be kind. These rocks are meant to make people happy, so their phrases should always be positive. Stay clear of negative thoughts, bad language, or anything inappropriate. You never know who is going to find the rocks.

  • Place your rocks in open spaces, not in places that will disturb nature or damage a lawnmower.

https://rockpainting101.com/kindness-rocks-instructions/

Show Our Direct Support Professionals Some Love!

The Direct Support Professional acts as a mentor, teacher, and support to individuals with intellectual and other types of developmental disabilities to assist them to live, learn and work successfully as an active part of their communities. The Direct Support Professional provides supports as needed, whether in individual’s homes, day services locations and/or community settings, to transform lives and help each individual reach their full potential, while always taking into consideration their dreams and goals for their own lives.

With COVID-19, our DSPs can add “Virus Warriors” to their list of responsibilities. They are diligently working around the clock to keep those residing in our group homes safe. Not only are our DSPs maintaining the safety of our residents, but they are also now working twice as hard to establish a new normal for those whose lives depend on routine. They are working hard to help individuals learn and grow with limited resources.

Please considering sending a kindness card to our DSPs to show that their hard work is appreciated and they are not forgotten as essential workers during this crisis. CRi has over 500 staff supporting over 300 residents within our group homes and 600 more within the community.

Supplies: - Paper - Pens, color pencils, crayons, markers, puffy paint - Stickers (optional) - Stamps (optional) - Glue (Optional)

How to Get Started

1) Grab a piece of paper. Any paper will do! As long as we can read your message, that’s the important part.

2) CRi has 40+ homes that we support. Making the cards generic will help with distribution.

3) Be creative! Be colorful! As long as the card comes from the heart, we are grateful!

4) Add an inspirational/uplifting message! Keep the tone upbeat. Please avoid any religious or political messages to respect the individual believes of our staff. Examples: a) Thank you for all you do! b) You are wonderful! c) I’m amazed by you! d) Keep up the outstanding work!

Appreciation cards can be dropped off or mailed to the following addresses:

Chantilly HQ - 14160 Newbrook Dr, Chantilly, VA 20151

  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby beyond the double glass doors

Arlington/Falls Church Maintenance Office - 7297A Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA 22042

  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby just inside the front door

Richmond - 808 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 120, Richmond, VA 23235

  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 8am to 3:30pm

Homemade Masks Needed!

Some of the individuals CRi supports are some of our community’s most vulnerable, and as such, are in dire need of homemade masks. If you are able to sew, please consider making masks for CRi residents and direct support professionals. Not sure where to get started? Check out the CDC’s website for instructions on homemade cloth masks - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-make-cloth-face-covering.html.

Once masks are made, they can be donated at one of three locations:

Chantilly HQ

  • 14160 Newbrook Dr, Chantilly, VA 20151
  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby beyond the double glass doors
  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

Arlington/Falls Church Maintenance Office

  • 7297A Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA 22042
  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby just inside the front door
  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 10am to 2pm

Richmond

  • 808 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 120 Richmond, VA 23235
  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 8am to 3:30pm

Homemade Sensory Boards for Residents

With COVID changing the way we all interact with the world, we’ve had to adjust our routines, implement coping mechanisms, and find new strategies to connect with our loved ones. CRi residents have had to do the same, but many don’t understand why. They can no longer go to their day-programs, see friends from other homes, or venture into the community for a fun outing. Sensory boards can help individuals with mental health needs and developmental disabilities work on directing their focus and practicing their motor skills. Sensory boards present multiple stimuli that are great outlets for residents and provide tools to staff to encourage continued development while homebound.

How can you help? Find items in your house that you can add to the board that can be a tactile stimulant (smooth, rough, soft, hard – tile, fabric, carpet, old plastic toy), make a noise (bike bell, old computer mouse or keyboard, Velcro), or be manipulated (light switch, door knob, chair wheels, old calculator, chain locks). This is a great activity to complete with the kids and a great way to up-cycle some of the items around the house. Check out this website for ideas and inspiration: https://www.weareteachers.com/diy-sensory-board-for-classroom/

Supplies

  • Base board - You can use plywood or MDF. Home Depot and Lowes might have some small scrap pieces you can purchase at a discount. Plywood is better than plastic as it’s sturdier and easier to glue stuff to.

  • Sand paper – 100 – 200 grit.

  • Glue – STRONG glue. Ideally something like Gorilla glue that can be used for multiple surfaces.

  • Paint and paintbrushes – Optional! Make sure to use something like Behr Paint and Primer In-One or you can use stain to keep some of that natural wood finish. Adding a touch of color will help provide a smooth and colorful background for your sensory board.

  • Drill, drill bits, and screws (Optional)

  • ALL THE THINGS

    • Something soft (Feathers? Felt?)

    • Something rough (Lego pieces? Velcro?)

    • Something that makes a noise (Old computer mouse, old key board, metal chain, plastic belt?)

    • Something interactive (Old remote control, zipper, door knobs, fidget spinner?)

How to Get Started

1) Find a good piece of wood for your base board.

2) Sand down the edges and surfaces of the board. Say no to splinters!

3) If you would like to add color to your base board, do it now to let the board dry.

4) While you wait, and this is the fun part, grab the family and start collecting the items for your board! They can be anything around the house and a great way to upcycle some old items. When identifying objects for your board think about how they will need to be secured to the wood (Screws? Glue? Tile adhesive? etc) and that they are explorer friendly (no sharp edges, no small, loose edible pieces, and each piece has been cleaned and sanitized). Suggestion – if using items that require batteries, make sure not to glue the access to the batteries to the board so they can be exchanged.

  • Look for variety:

    • Something soft (Ex: Piece of felt, piece of velvet)

    • Something textured (Ex: Lego pieces, Velcro, piece of carpet)

    • Something that makes a noise (Ex: Old computer mouse, old key board, metal chain, plastic clicky belt)

    • Something interactive (Ex: Old remote control, zipper, door knobs, fidget spinner)

5) Once you have collected all your items. Plan on how you would like them placed on your board. Make sure there is enough space on the board to interact with each item.

6) Depending on the items you would like to use, you will need different tools (glue, drill and screws, etc) to adhere them to the base board. This is an adults only step. Be cognizant of the fumes if using super glue.

Tip: Check out your local Habitat Restore for the base board and fun items to add to your collection like tile, chair wheels, or coiled door stops that go “Boing”.

7) Let dry.

8) Test run! Make sure you test out all the components:

  • Is everything securely attached to the board?

  • There are no small pieces that can fall/be broken off?

  • Are there sharp corners or edges?

  • If it’s fun to touch or fiddle with, you’ve done good work!

9) Sanitize before donating!

Interactive Sound Sensory Boards for CRi Residents

Are you looking for a fun yet slightly more advanced project to complete with your family that’s both educational and impactful? Consider making an Interactive Sound Sensory Board for CRi residents to help them develop their fine motor skills, help direct their focus, and have a fun and creative outlet.

Interactive Sensory Boards are a great way for your family to learn about electricity and coding while having fun working together to build something unique and innovative. The Interactive Sound Sensory Board is a great starter project be it that you assemble the items yourself or purchase the kit through Bare Conductive. Either way, no soldering is required!

Getting Started

OR
Bare Conductive Touch Board Starter Kit - https://www.bareconductive.com/shop/touch-board-starter-kit/

  • Instead of building your board on a wall, use an MDF board or sanded and sealed plywood. This video uses an acrylic board to attach the circuits which is durable and light weight, but not the best adhesive for the electric paint.
  • Glue all the pieces onto the board, even the speakers if they’re small enough. Just be sure to leave enough room for the SD card and any plugs, such as the power cord, to be removed.
  • Be creative with the designs and the sounds! Go with a theme such as nature – (birds chirping, leaves rustling, bubbling stream, etc), car sounds – you can even design you board to be the dashboard of a car (horn honking, acceleration, breaking, radio, blinker, etc), animal sounds, a piano, or an entire band (drums, guitar, base, snare, etc). The opportunities are endless!
  • Make sure all noises work and everything is glued on securely before donating at any one of our three locations listed at the top of the page.

If you want a more challenging project, check out Bare Conductive’s website for more ideas, or consider creating an Interactive Light Sensory Board - https://www.instructables.com/id/Interactive-LED-Tile-Wall-Easier-Than-It-Looks/.

Many thanks to Instructables.com and Bare Conductive for the inspiration and instruction!

Love Rocks

Have you ever found yourself walking down the street only to have a pop of color catch your eye? What’s that?! A rock. A colorful rock. With something nice on it that just made your day. This is a great family friendly project to get those creative juices flowing while spreading some kindness and promoting CRi!

Supplies

  • Rocks! Preferably smooth river rocks, but any rocks of any size and color will do!

  • Acrylic paint – bold bright colors and/or solid dark colors hold up best

  • Paint brushes – various sizes

  • Cup of water

  • Newspaper or plastic drop cloth

  • Acrylic paint pens (not necessary, but certainly fun!)

  • Stencils (not necessary, but helpful!)

  • Sealant - https://rockpainting101.com/best-sealer-painted-rocks/

How to get started

1) Prep your workspace – Either indoors or outdoors, make sure it’s well ventilated. Lay down your newspaper or drop cloth to prevent any spills.

2) Choose your rocks – Make sure that the design you wish to paint fits on your rock.

3) Wash your rocks – Rinse your rock in water to remove any excess dirt that might come off during the painting process.

4) Let your rocks dry - Do not skip this step! Yes, we know its time consuming but any excess water will mix with the paint in the next step and it won’t stick to the rock’s surface as well as it should.

5) Design and paint your rocks – Spread the love! Lots of color is always a good option, and any uplifting sayings will be sure to bring a smile to someone’s face. Be sure to tag the rock using the following hashtags on the back #MyCRi or #EmbraceCRi.

6) Let your rocks dry again – Do not skip this step either!

7) Seal your rocks – Whether you use paint-on sealer or spray, make sure your paint is dry before you start! Apply the coats lightly and use multiple coats.

8) Let them dry – last time!

9) Share your rocks! – First, share photos of your rocks on social media with the hashtag #MyCRi or #EmbraceCRi. Then, hide your rocks in your yard (or along your regular daily stroll for positive mental and physical health!) for people to spot or put them along your sidewalk for people to take and hide themselves.

**Rock Painting Tips and Tricks Courtesy of rockpainting101.com **

  • Make sure that you seal your rocks well. You want them to hold up to the elements until they are found.

  • Never glue embellishments to rocks you plan on hiding. While they are beautiful, these additions are terrible for the environment and the animals. No matter how strong you think that glue is, a squirrel is going to be able to pick it off. Stick to paint on any rock you plan on hiding.

  • Be kind. These rocks are meant to make people happy, so their phrases should always be positive. Stay clear of negative thoughts, bad language, or anything inappropriate. You never know who is going to find the rocks.

  • Place your rocks in open spaces, not in places that will disturb nature or damage a lawnmower.

https://rockpainting101.com/kindness-rocks-instructions/

Show Our Direct Support Professionals Some Love!

The Direct Support Professional acts as a mentor, teacher, and support to individuals with intellectual and other types of developmental disabilities to assist them to live, learn and work successfully as an active part of their communities. The Direct Support Professional provides supports as needed, whether in individual’s homes, day services locations and/or community settings, to transform lives and help each individual reach their full potential, while always taking into consideration their dreams and goals for their own lives.

With COVID-19, our DSPs can add “Virus Warriors” to their list of responsibilities. They are diligently working around the clock to keep those residing in our group homes safe. Not only are our DSPs maintaining the safety of our residents, but they are also now working twice as hard to establish a new normal for those whose lives depend on routine. They are working hard to help individuals learn and grow with limited resources.

Please considering sending a kindness card to our DSPs to show that their hard work is appreciated and they are not forgotten as essential workers during this crisis. CRi has over 500 staff supporting over 300 residents within our group homes and 600 more within the community.

Supplies: - Paper - Pens, color pencils, crayons, markers, puffy paint - Stickers (optional) - Stamps (optional) - Glue (Optional)

How to Get Started

1) Grab a piece of paper. Any paper will do! As long as we can read your message, that’s the important part.

2) CRi has 40+ homes that we support. Making the cards generic will help with distribution.

3) Be creative! Be colorful! As long as the card comes from the heart, we are grateful!

4) Add an inspirational/uplifting message! Keep the tone upbeat. Please avoid any religious or political messages to respect the individual believes of our staff. Examples: a) Thank you for all you do! b) You are wonderful! c) I’m amazed by you! d) Keep up the outstanding work!

Appreciation cards can be dropped off or mailed to the following addresses:

Chantilly HQ - 14160 Newbrook Dr, Chantilly, VA 20151

  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby beyond the double glass doors

Arlington/Falls Church Maintenance Office - 7297A Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA 22042

  • Accepting donations Monday - Sunday from 10am to 2pm

  • Donation boxes are located in the lobby just inside the front door

Richmond - 808 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 120, Richmond, VA 23235

  • Accepting donations Monday - Friday from 8am to 3:30pm

Ongoing Opportunities

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Thanks for your interest in volunteering!